Introduction

Message from the Chancellor

Welcome to the Spring 2021 Tar Heel Commencement ceremony! Our undergraduate, graduate, and professional students have accomplished so much here at Carolina, and especially in the past year during a global pandemic. Their personal drive and determination to learn, create, and serve, guided by faculty who believed in them, brought our graduates to this remarkable accomplishment. This is the moment where we join as a community to celebrate their success. To the countless family members and friends who encouraged our graduates and allowed them to take their dreams and passions to the next level in their lives: Thank you. Your support and love for our graduates today have brought them to this place. Your many contributions and sacrifices during this difficult year and beyond have not gone unnoticed. An enduring quality of Carolina graduates is how they fearlessly confront the most difficult problems of their time. You have already overcome incredible challenges during your time here. Your Carolina experience and resilience, especially over this past year, have prepared you to help society adjust and adapt to our ever-changing environment. I have faith that your curiosity and ingenuity will help us discover solutions to the grand challenges of our time and create a better world. I encourage you to remain connected to your Carolina family. Our university’s culture of collaboration is unique, and it doesn’t end at graduation. Our global network of alumni stands ready to aid you in making your personal mark on our state, nation, and world. Congratulations! We look forward to learning about your accomplishments in the years ahead.

Kevin M. Guskiewicz Chancellor

Alma Mater

The words of “Hark the Sound,’’ UNC–Chapel Hill’s alma mater, were written in 1897 by William Starr Myers, a graduating senior. The Glee Club director asked Myers to put words to the tune “Amici,” and the song was first performed on June 2, 1897, as part of the Glee Club’s Commencement performance in Gerrard Hall. Soon the song was almost forgotten. When a University quartet tried a few years later to remember the words, they could recollect only the first verse and the chorus of Myers’ original version. Two members of the quartet, Charles S. Mangum and Charles T. Woollen, added two verses to the one they remembered. Mangum later became a professor in the School of Medicine, and Woollen worked as the University’s business manager and comptroller.

For Your Information

The Commencement ceremony will be captioned on the video screens.*

Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of this program’s content. Any omissions or errors are unintentional. The graduates’ names listed in this Commencement program were submitted prior to administering final examinations. Therefore, the inclusion of degree candidates’ names in this program does not represent certification that candidates have satisfactorily completed degree requirements.

Unless special arrangements have been made by departments, diplomas for all May degrees will be printed after graduation and mailed to graduates. For further information, visit the Registrar's website.

* Captioning by Caption Perfect.

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"What is it that binds us to this place..."

Charles Kuralt

Ceremony Details

The Chancellor's Medal

The chancellor’s medal, an emblem of the office of chancellor, is worn during the University’s ceremonial occasions. The sterling silver disk, which is three inches in diameter and seven ounces Troy weight, was given to the University by John Sanders, professor emeritus and former director of the UNC Institute of Government, and his wife, Ann Beal Sanders. Modeled by sculptor Pete Hinton and bearing the University seal, it was first worn by Chancellor Paul Hardin during the 1994 University Day convocation. The medal was recently updated with a silver chain of office that includes thin rectangles engraved with the names and dates of service of previous UNC chancellors. It also features links made in the shape of the Old Well and the Davie Poplar leaves, both icons of the Carolina campus.

Bicentennial Staff

The faculty marshal carries the bicentennial staff while leading the faculty processional on ceremonial occasions such as Commencement and University Day. The staff, commissioned for the University’s 1993 bicentennial celebration by John Sanders, professor emeritus and former director of the UNC Institute of Government, and his wife, Ann Beal Sanders, was modeled by sculptor Pete Hinton. It consists of a sterling silver three-inch-high replica of the Old Well mounted on a turned and tapered oak shaft. The shaft was made from timber salvaged from the 1822 section of Old West residence hall during its 1991–1993 renovation.

University Colors

As symbols of unity among Carolina students, alumni and fans, the school colors of light blue and white were first used around 1800 to distinguish between members of the Dialectic and Philanthropic Literary Societies. Throughout the 19th century, students were required to be members of either the Di or the Phi. The Di’s color was light blue, and the Phi’s was white.

At University commencements, balls and other social events, the student officials, managers and marshals wore the color of their society, blue or white. Because the chief marshal or chief ball manager represented the whole student body, not just his society, he wore both colors.

When the University fielded its first intercollegiate athletic teams in 1888, the question of what colors to wear had already been answered. Light blue and white had come to symbolize membership in the University, not in a single society.

The University Seal

The University seal typically appears on diplomas and graduation materials, grade transcripts and documents that indicate accomplishment in or on behalf of the University.

The first seal of the University of North Carolina, designed in 1790, showed the face of Apollo and his emblem, the rising sun, used to symbolize the dawn of higher education in the state. The words “SIGUL UNIVERSITAT CAROL SEPTENT” (Seal of the University of North Carolina) surrounded the drawing.

A modification in 1895 added lighted torches of learning beside Apollo’s profile. Two years later another alteration replaced Apollo’s head with a shield on which the words Lux (light) and Libertas (liberty), separated by a white band running from the upper right to the lower left of the shield, appeared.

In the 1940s, some observers mistakenly claimed the white stripe on the shield was a bend sinister, a heraldic code that was demeaning. In truth, the stripe was a bar sinister and merely denoted a second or later son. Still, the direction of the stripe was reversed, removing any question of stigma.

Today’s seal is the same as the 1897 version, except the stripe runs from the upper left to the lower right.

Academic Dress

The following information, based in part on An Academic Costume Code and Ceremony Guide (published by the American Council on Education), may be helpful in identifying academic attire worn during UNC’s Commencement exercises.

Degree Candidates’ Regalia

The University’s bachelor’s gown, designed by Alexander Julian, is both Carolina blue and truly green, as in sustainably made. The fabric for the True Blue gown is made from 100 percent post-consumer recycled plastic bottles (23 bottles for each gown) and is manufactured at mills in the Carolinas. The information about the gown’s sustainability is suitably printed directly on the cloth, without the use of an extra label. In addition to being dyed a custom Carolina blue color, the True Blue gowns also have a streamlined fit, with white piping along the yoke and two white panels in front. The tassels are blue and white, topped with a silver-colored Old Well medallion. An optional accessory is an embroidered white stole that the graduate may give to a parent in gratitude after the Commencement ceremony.

The untrimmed, black master’s gown has a hood and an oblong sleeve, open at the wrist, that hangs nearly to the ground; the back part of its oblong shape is square cut and the arc in the front is cut away. The hooded doctoral gown features three bars across each sleeve. In 1999, the Faculty Council authorized a special doctoral gown for Carolina graduates. It is Carolina blue, with facings and crossbars of dark blue outlined in white piping. The facings bear the shield of the University supported by the torches of learning.

The hoods of master’s and doctoral degree candidates vary in color according to the field of study (see list below).

Faculty Regalia

Faculty wear the regalia of the institution that conferred their highest degree. The doctoral gowns are usually faced with black velvet, although the color of the velvet may vary according to the field of study. Hoods, which differ in length according to the level of the degree held, are lined with official colors of the university or college that conferred the degree, usually with one color forming a chevron pattern over the other. Some colors you will see on faculty and administrators’ robes are, for example, the crimson of Harvard, the maroon of Chicago, the orange and black of Princeton, the dark blue of Yale, and the light blue and white of North Carolina.

Like the hoods of master’s and doctoral degree candidates, faculty hoods are edged and bound with velvet in the color appropriate to the field of study. The colors in the hoods and gowns of faculty and administrators represent the following fields in which degrees were taken:

Apricot: Nursing

Brown: Fine Arts

Citron: Social Work

Crimson: Journalism

Dark Blue: Philosophy

Golden Yellow: Science

Green: Medicine

Lemon Yellow: Library Science

Light Blue: Education

Lilac: Dentistry

Olive Green: Pharmacy

Orange: Engineering

Peacock Blue: Public Administration

Pink: Music

Purple: Law

Sage Green: Physical Education

Salmon Pink: Public Health

Scarlet: Theology

Yellow Brown: Commerce, Business, Accountancy

White: Arts, Letters, Humanities

Commencement Committee

Ronald P. Strauss, Chair

Tiffany Bailey

Brett Botta

Bonita Brown

Juan Castro

Mimi V. Chapman

Jeni Cook

Joel G. Curran

Douglas S. Dibbert

Lauren M. DiGrazia

Michael (Keith) Ellington

Jeffrey W. Fuchs

Elizabeth Hall

Deborah L. Hawkins

Amy Locklear Hertel

Shayna Hill

Sarah Elizabeth Jacobson

S. Katy Lucci

Kelly Miller

Mark Moon

Patricia S. Parker

Valerie A. Price

Preeyanka Rao

Lamar Richards

Desirée Rieckenberg

Charles Robinette

James I. Spurling

Vincas Steponaitis

Neel Swamy

Natalie Vizuete

Stacey Harris Warner

Degrees and Certificates

The following is a list of all degrees and certificates available to students at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Undergraduate Certificates

Certificate in Business Journalism

Certificate in Cytotechnology

Certificate in Dental Hygiene

Certificate in Radiography

Certificate in Sports Communication Certificate – UNC Core

Undergraduate Degrees

Bachelor of Arts with a major in: African, African American, and Diaspora Studies; American Studies; Anthropology; Archaeology; Art History; Asian Studies; Biology; Chemistry; Classics; Communication Studies; Comparative Literature; Computer Science; Contemporary European Studies; Dramatic Art; Economics; English; English and Comparative Literature; Environmental Studies; Exercise and Sport Science; Geography; Geological Sciences; Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures; Global Studies; History; Human and Organizational Leadership and Development; Interdisciplinary Studies; Latin American Studies; Linguistics; Management and Society; Mathematics; Medical Anthropology; Music; Peace, War, and Defense; Philosophy; Physics; Political Science; Psychology; Public Policy; Religious Studies; Romance Languages; Sociology; Studio Art; Women’s and Gender Studies

Bachelor of Arts in Business Journalism

Bachelor of Arts in Education

Bachelor of Arts in Media and Journalism

Bachelor of Fine Arts

Bachelor of Music

Bachelor of Science with a major in: Biology; Biomedical and Health Sciences Engineering; Chemistry; Computer Science; Economics; Environmental Sciences; Geological Sciences; Mathematics; Neuroscience; Physics; Psychology; Statistics and Analytics

Bachelor of Science in Business Administration

Bachelor of Science in Clinical Laboratory Science

Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene

Bachelor of Science in Information Science

Bachelor of Science in Nursing

Bachelor of Science in Pharmaceutical Sciences

Bachelor of Science in Public Health with a major in: Biostatistics; Environmental Health Sciences; Health Policy and Management; Nutrition

Bachelor of Science in Radiologic Science

Postbaccalaureate and Post-Master's Certificates

Postbaccalaureate Certificate in Community Preparedness and Disaster Management

Postbaccalaureate Certificate in Core Public Health Concepts Postbaccalaureate Certificate in Digital Communication

Postbaccalaureate Certificate in Field Epidemiology

Postbaccalaureate Certificate in Global Health

Postbaccalaureate Certificate in Occupational Health Nursing Specialty

Postbaccalaureate Certificate in Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner

Postbaccalaureate Certificate in Public Health Leadership

Postbaccalaureate Certificate in Technology and Communication

Post-Master’s Certificate in Information and Library Science

Post-Doctoral Certificates

Post-Doctoral Certificate in Dental Specialty Foundation

Graduate Degrees

Master of Accounting

Master of Arts in the discipline of: American Studies; Anthropology; Art History; Asian and Middle Eastern Studies; Biology; Chemistry; Classics; Communication Studies; Digital Communication; Ecology; Education; Educational Innovation, Technology, and Entrepreneurship; English and Comparative Literature; Exercise and Sport Science; Folklore; Geography; German Studies; Global Studies; History; Linguistics; Mass Communication; Mathematics; Media and Communication; Musicology; Philosophy; Political Science; Psychology; Public Policy; Religious Studies; Romance Languages and Literatures; School Psychology; Sociology; Technology and Communication

Master of Arts in Teaching

Master of Business Administration

Master of Clinical Laboratory Science

Master of City and Regional Planning

Master of Education in the discipline of: Education for Experienced Teachers; School Counseling; School Psychology

Master of Fine Arts in the discipline of: Dramatic Art; Studio Art

Master of Healthcare Administration

Master of Health Sciences

Master of Laws

Master of Physical Therapy

Master of Professional Science in the discipline of: Biomedical and Health Informatics; Digital Curation and Management; Toxicology

Master of Public Administration

Master of Public Health in the discipline of: Biostatistics; Environmental Sciences and Engineering; Epidemiology; Health Behavior; Health Policy and Management; Maternal and Child Health; Nutrition; Public Health Leadership

Master of Radiologic Science

Master of School Administration

Master of Science in the discipline of: Biochemistry and Biophysics; Bioinformatics and Computational Biology; Biology; Biomedical Engineering; Biostatistics; Cell Biology and Physiology; Chemistry; Clinical Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling; Computer Science; Dental Hygiene Education; Ecology; Economics; Endodontics; Environmental Sciences and Engineering; Genetics and Molecular Biology; Geological Sciences; Human Movement Science; Management; Marine Sciences; Materials Science; Mathematics; Microbiology and Immunology; Neuroscience; Nutrition; Occupational Science; Occupational Therapy; Operative Dentistry; Operative Dentistry and Biomaterials; Oral and Craniofacial Biomedicine; Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology; Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology; Orthodontics; Pathology; Pediatric Dentistry; Periodontology; Pharmaceutical Sciences; Pharmacology; Physics; Prosthodontics; Speech and Hearing Sciences; Statistics and Operations Research; Toxicology

Master of Science in Clinical Research

Master of Science in Disaster Management

Master of Science in Environmental Engineering

Master of Science in Information Science

Master of Science in Library Science

Master of Science in Nursing

Master of Science in Public Health in the discipline of: Biostatistics; Environmental Sciences and Engineering; Epidemiology; Health Behavior; Health Policy and Management; Maternal and Child Health

Master of Social Work

Doctor of Nursing Practice

Doctor of Philosophy in the discipline of: American Studies; Anthropology; Art History; Biochemistry and Biophysics; Bioinformatics and Computational Biology; Biology; Biological and Biomedical Science; Biomedical Engineering; Biostatistics; Business Administration; Cell Biology and Physiology; Chemistry; City and Regional Planning; Classics; Communication Studies; Computer Science; Ecology; Economics; Education; English and Comparative Literature; Environmental Sciences and Engineering; Epidemiology; Genetics and Molecular Biology; Geography; Geological Sciences; German Studies; Germanic Languages; Health Behavior; Health Informatics; Health Policy and Management; History; Human Movement Science; Information and Library Science; Marine Sciences; Mass Communication; Materials Science; Maternal and Child Health; Mathematics; Media and Communication; Microbiology and Immunology; Musicology; Neuroscience; Nursing; Nutrition; Occupational Science; Oral and Craniofacial Biomedicine; Pathology; Pharmaceutical Sciences; Pharmacology; Philosophy; Physics; Political Science; Psychology; Public Policy; Religious Studies; Romance Languages and Literatures; School Psychology; Social Work; Sociology; Speech and Hearing Sciences; Statistics and Operations Research; Toxicology

Doctor of Public Health in the discipline of: Biostatistics; Health Behavior; Maternal and Child Health; Nutrition; Public Health Executive Leadership

Professional Degrees

Doctor of Audiology

Doctor of Dental Surgery

Doctor of Education in the discipline of: Curriculum and Instruction; Educational Leadership

Doctor of Medicine

Doctor of Pharmacy

Doctor of Physical Therapy

Juris Doctor

Published by the UNC–Chapel Hill Office of the Registrar and UNC Creative.

Photos copyright the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL IS A CONSTITUENT INSTITUTION OF THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA.

Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of this program’s content. Any omissions or errors are unintentional.